Mar(k): Travel, Hiking, and "Doing Good"

musings on our life of travel and volunteering

Posts Tagged ‘South Korea

Hiking tips for South Korea

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Some of the most enjoyable time we spent, during our month in South Korea was in some of the absolutely beautiful National Parks.  Not only were there some fantastic hiking trails, but invariably they were also a place to see some well preserved Korean temples.  Given that many of the mountains in South Korea are sacred, having a temple there dedicated to worshipping the mountain makes good sense.   It was a great way to get some cultural sightseeing done, while also enjoying Mother Nature’s wonderland.

South Korea surely must win the award for the most well maintained hiking trails in the world!   Wow.  We were sooo impressed!   But it kind of makes sense, when you see how wildly popular hiking is with the locals.  There are a LOT of people on the trails.

We weren’t the only ones on top of South Korea’s highest peak!

To help you out, here are a few tips which may assist in making the most of your hiking time in South Korea:

  • It is a bit difficulty to find details hiking info in English.  One place you can try is through the National Park site.
  • Whilst online information in English is a bit of a challenge, once you are at the trailheads, we (almost) always found signage in English.   So don’t worry!   (tip: take a photo with your phone of the map at the trailhead, as there is not often any other maps along the route, although there will be ample markers)
  • The trails are incredibly well maintained, and well signposted.  On steeper sections, the concept of switchbacks seems to be largely overlooked, but there are often steps put in.  Fantastic workout for the glutes and quads, that’s for sure!
  • Water is readily available on the trails (well, at least on all the trails we were on, and there were a few!).  Lots of the temples have water “fountains” which you can fill up at, as well.
  • Bring along some snacks to share.  South Koreans love to share some food at the top.  Sliced up apple, biscuits, chocolate or dried fruit are always a favourite.
  • Don’t be too put off by the level of difficulty of hikes.  We were originally quite intimidated by the hikers we saw coming down from trails, kitted out like they were ready for Everest!   Hiking poles, mountaineering boots, gaiters, quick dry from tip to tow, hats, the lot!   Then when we would actually get onto these incredibly well groomed trails, it was more than do-able.  But South Koreas take their hiking seriously, and need to look the part!
  • Per the above, we absolutely LOVED how colourful everyone is!  Because hiking is taken so seriously, even the casual day hiker has the full on gear.  We paled into insignificance with our drab greys, blacks and muted tones.  Bright yellow, pink, green and purple was definitely de rigueur, often worn all at once!
  • Some other blogs that have some good info on hikes can be found here and here.

Enjoy!

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Written by Mar(k)

July 31, 2017 at 6:35 pm

Travel Tips for South Korea

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Many of the Travel Tips for Japan apply also to Korea. Some exceptions are:

• Buses rather than trains are generally the easiest way to get around the country. Buses are so frequent that it in many cases it is just a matter of turning up at the terminal and buying a ticket for the next bus. Note that “express buses” are the quickest and most comfortable. “Inter-city buses” stop along the route. There are usually tourist information bureaus at the bus terminals. On several occasions, we found it helpful to get them to write our destination in Korean. We could then show this to the person selling tickets (beware, place names are very similar and easily confused if you don’t have them written in Korean!).
• You can purchase sim cards for both data and phone calls. As wifi is readily available we didn’t find it necessary.
• Credit cards are accepted just about everywhere.
• Public transport in all major cities and even taxis use “T Money” cards. These work the same way as a Suica card (in Japan). We purchased ours at the airport on arrival for 50,000 Won and used it on the Airport Express bus which delivered us to within a few 100 metres of our Airbnb (they have a number of different routes). We could have caught the metro but this would have involved multiple transfers.
• All the hotels we stayed in and restaurants we ate at were non-smoking. Quite a different experience in Japan, where many noodle places were so smoky we could not eat there.
• Although 7/11’s had a withdrawal limit of 100,000 Won, CU (an equally ubiquitous convenience store) had a limit in excess of 200,000 (maybe 300,00 Won like the Standard Chartered bank). We found that most atm’s at local banks didn’t accept our debit card, even if the bank displayed an international logo.

We LOVED South Korea!   Once we were outside of Seoul and Busan, we really felt like we were off the (Western) tourist track, and loved the challenge.   Highly recommended as a destination for the well seasoned traveller.

Written by Mar(k)

July 3, 2017 at 9:07 pm